Word of the Day – “fähig”

faehig-meaningHello everyone,

and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time we’ll have a look at the meaning of

fähig

Fähig is a nice word. It’s easily overlooked but you can actually do a lot with it, heck it can help you do ANYTHING. But it’s kind of a weird word, too, because it’s  ig, which is one of the standard endings to create and adjective from something, added to  fäh.  And fäh is … well…  a very stupid sounding syllable. Fäh.  Fäääääääääh. So inelegant. What does it mean? Well, I had no idea and I had to look up where it comes from. I would never have guessed THAT origin but once you know it the words makes a lot of sense. Drumroll please…  brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr…  Continue reading

Listen to German – 1

listening-der-haseHello everyone

sooooo….  I bought a microphone recently because I’m planning to do flash cards with audio and once I had it at home I was thinking:  why not actually also train listening a bit here by reading something. And then I also had an idea for what to read… fables. Animal tales. Animals are cool to begin with, but also fables are really old, so there are no more annoying copyright issues anymore (an author has to be dead for 70!!!! years before you can use the work without paying), fables are short, they are fun and the language is surprisingly “daily”… way more so than in fairy tales. And so I decided to give it a try. Continue reading

Prefix Verb Shorts – “die Ausnahme”

ausnahme-german-exceptionHello everyone,

and welcome to a new episode of our summer series about German prefix verbs. This time we’ll have a look at a verb that is one of the main reasons why language learning can suck. Get ready for a look at the meaning of the verb

die Ausnahme

Wait… this is weird. I … I thought verbs don’t have articles. Is this one an excepti… what? … oh… ohhhh…  a noun… haha… right, I just thought… uh… I… let’s just move on. Die Ausnahme is a of course a noun, and having it as the topic for a prefix verb short is an exception. But there’s a good reason. Ausnahme is an exception indeed. In fact, it is THE exception. Continue reading

Word of the Day – “Rücken”

rucken-ruecken-meaning-germHello everyone,

and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time, we’ll take a look at the meaning of

Rücken

Now you’re all like “Rücken? This topic is  booooooooooooooooooring.” but no, it’s not . A Rücken can be very nice. There’s even an idiom for it

  • Auch ein schöner Rücken kann entzücken.
  • A beautiful rear can also endear.

So… let’s take a look at Rücken and I promise you… there’s more to this word that you think.
Most of you probably know it already – der  Rücken means the backBack is an old Germanic word for the back but for some reason it has disappeared from most Germanic languages. They all use a version of Rücken. Now, Rücken is related to ridge and the two words probably go back to the “It’s crazy how ancient it is“-Indo-European root *(s)ker which was about Continue reading

Prefix Verb Shorts – “angeben”

angebenHello everyone,

and welcome to another episode of Prefix Verb Shorts.
Whether you have to fill out a form or impress your friends… today’s word will help you with that. Ladies and gentlemen… get ready for a quick look at the super useful meanings of

angeben

An has two notions that it can add to a verb: “on-ness” (as in going/not off, ) and “at-ness” (or its directed sister toward-ness). In case of geben which means to give we’re only dealing with one of them… the latter. And if not that one then it’s the former. Yap,  I actually have no idea. But it doesn’t really matter in this case. The only thing an does with geben is making it more specific. Geben is for giving all kinds of things… cups, glasses, plates or shits; angeben is for: information. It means as much as Continue reading